• The Root Canal Treatment Process

    Many patients may feel nervous when they are told they need a root canal procedure and dental crown. However, root canal therapy in Peoria is a simple procedure that is very similar to a traditional dental filling. Let’s take a closer look at the process of treating an infected root canal. root - canal - procedure

    Prepare the Tooth

    Before a root canal procedure can begin, the affected tooth must be prepared. Local anesthesia will be administered so the patient will feel comfortable. The dentist or endodontist—a dental specialist trained in endodontic therapy—will protect the tooth from any wetness or bacteria by placing a dental dam around it. This dam is a thin piece of plastic that fits between the affected tooth and teeth nearby. The affected tooth will then be sanitized and dried.

    Remove the Pulp

    After the affected area has been prepared, the dentist will drill into the tooth, usually from the side, to reach the infected pulp and root canals. The dentist will then remove the tooth pulp, tooth nerves, and any signs of infection within the tooth. A tooth can survive without the pulp and nerves, if it is preserved correctly.

    Clean the Canals

    The root canals must be completely cleaned and sealed against future infections. The dentist will disinfect all the canals to be sure there is no remaining infection. Once he feels positive the inner tooth is safe, he will seal the canals with a material called gutta-percha. This is a rubbery substance that seals the canals from potential bacteria that might cause a future infection.

    Place a Crown

    Though a root canal procedure saves the tooth root, the tooth’s function can only be restored with a dental crown in place. This part of the treatment may take two visits. The dentist will place a temporary dental crown to protect the tooth until a custom crown can be made, usually within a week. During the second visit, the custom dental crown will be fitted and cemented in place.

  • What Are Composite Fillings?

    One of the foundations of general dentistry near Peoria is composite dental fillings. These modern fillings are used to match and protect tooth enamel from tooth decay and cavities. A dentist will often recommend a composite filling to fill in a cavity located on the front teeth or in an area of the mouth that will be noticed often.

    As seen in the video, composite fillings are made from a mixture of plastic resin and ground, glass particles. Similar to dental crowns, composite fillings can be made to match the color of a patient’s tooth so that the filling will blend in with the natural tooth color. Composite fillings are a popular dental restoration of cosmetic dentistry, but they may not always be the strongest choice for cavities located in a molar. A dentist will discuss all of the available options depending on where the cavity is located.

  • A Look at the Stages of Periodontal Disease

    Many people suffer with one of the three stages of periodontal disease—gingivitis, periodontitis, or advanced periodontitis. When patients suffer from periodontal disease near Peoria, they may need various types of treatments to correct and renew their smile. These treatments may include deep cleanings, improved daily dental care, tooth extractions, and dental implants to replace any missing teeth. This article will take a look at the various stages of periodontal disease to give you a better picture of what type of treatment may be necessary. periodontal - disease

    Stage 1: Gingivitis

    Gingivitis is the first stage in periodontal disease and the only stage that is reversible. Many people around the United States and the world have gingivitis, even though it can be easily prevented and reversed. Signs of gingivitis typically include swollen and red gums that may bleed when flossing or brushing. It is caused by plaque buildup around the gums, but it can by reversed with good daily dental care and by seeing a dentist for regular teeth cleanings and oral exams.

    Stage 2: Periodontitis

    If daily dental care has not improved, then gingivitis may progress to periodontitis, the second stage of periodontal disease. Patients may notice their breath smells bad, and their gums feel sore at times, in addition to bleeding and appearing swollen. Pockets of infection that gather food and plaque have begun to develop in the gums. The pockets of infection will begin to break down the bone and supporting tissues that hold the teeth in place. If periodontal disease treatment is started immediately, this stage may be halted and recovered.

    Stage 3: Advanced Periodontitis

    In the last stage of periodontal disease, patients’ supporting gum tissues and bones have been destroyed. The teeth may begin to shift or feel loose, resulting in potential tooth extractions and extensive periodontal disease treatment. In the event that teeth may not be saved, patients may consider having dental implants or dental bridges to replace the missing teeth. These options may be available, but patients’ oral and overall health must improve drastically for a dental implant procedure to be effective.

  • Reasons to Replace Missing Teeth

    Has your dentist near Peoria spoken to you about the importance of replacing your missing teeth? If you have missing teeth or require tooth extraction, then he will probably advise the use of dental implants as a solution. There are several reasons why you shouldn’t ignore your missing teeth: missing - teeth

    Enhanced Smile

    While a missing tooth can result in a number of oral health issues, people are often concerned about its effects on their appearance. When your smile is healthy and bright, this can help you feel more confident, outgoing, and willing to laugh and smile. A missing tooth, however, can detract from your overall appearance and cause you to feel self-conscious.

    Better Function

    When you have all of your teeth, they are positioned to provide you with an effective way to bite and chew. Each of your teeth plays an important role in this, and the loss of just one can affect how comfortably you can eat, and even how well you can talk. Replacing your missing tooth can help restore your dental function so you can eat and speak normally.

    Improved Heath

    When even one tooth is missing from your mouth, this can cause the neighboring teeth to shift out of place. If your teeth move out of position, this can further detract from the appearance of your smile, but can also bring about several health issues. Misaligned teeth can promote tooth decay, lead to gum disease, cause bad breath, and result in the loss of more teeth.

    Preserved Appearance

    Even if you don’t mind the gap left between your teeth, you should consider the effects that a missing tooth has on your jaw. When an area of your jawbone no longer holds a tooth root, your body begins a process called bone reabsorption. Over time, this can cause your jawbone to shrink and weaken, potentially affecting your facial bone structure. For this reason, dentists often recommend dental implants for patients with missing teeth.

  • How to Store Your Toothbrush

    It might surprise you to learn that there’s a good chance you’re storing your toothbrush incorrectly. Many people simply place their toothbrush in a case and slide it in a bathroom drawer after use. However, this can encourage bacterial growth on your toothbrush. Instead, after carefully brushing your teeth to prevent problems like periodontal disease and erosion of the tooth enamel, dentists near Peoria recommend rinsing your toothbrush very thoroughly.

    Then, store your toothbrush upright as recommended by the dentistry expert featured in this video. An upright storage technique allows your toothbrush to fully dry out between brushings, which inhibits bacteria growth. Look for a toothbrush that features a suction cup on the bottom that you can use to securely place it upright.

  • How Periodontal Disease Can Lead to Dental Implants

    Periodontal disease is a serious oral health condition with far-reaching implications. Along with systemic health problems, it can also lead to the need for dental implants. If you have been diagnosed with periodontal disease in Peoria, follow your treatment plan closely to minimize the impacts of the infection and protect your health. Here is a look at how having untreated periodontal disease increases your risk of needing dental implants.

    periodontal-disease

    Periodontal Disease 101

    Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is an infection in your gums caused by bacteria. The infection usually begins with plaque that has not been cleaned from the teeth surfaces becoming a hard substance called tartar. Tartar can only be removed during a professional dental cleaning, or it can easily enter your gums. When this happens, periodontal disease occurs. In its early stages, periodontal disease is called gingivitis and can usually be reversed with better oral hygiene practices. The advanced stage of the disease is called periodontitis and can cause significant health concerns, including tooth loss. Most people who receive dental implants because of periodontal disease have periodontitis.

    Periodontal Disease and Tooth Loss

    When periodontitis occurs, the gums pull away from the teeth, allowing infected spaces to form. These spaces allow toxins to grow below the visible gum line and to the jawbone beneath. As your immune system tries to fight the bacteria, both your immune response and the bacteria break down connective tissues and cause bone deterioration. This process causes your teeth to become loose. They may fall out or your dentist may suggest tooth extraction. This can occur in one tooth, or periodontitis can lead to complete tooth loss.

    Tooth Loss and Dental Implants

    Even if periodontal disease only claims one of your teeth, ignoring it can lead to further oral health problems. Your remaining teeth will shift, and the bone where your tooth was will deteriorate quickly. Dental implants offer a natural-looking solution to lost teeth and help to preserve your jawbone without putting pressure on neighboring teeth as other replacement methods can. For many people, getting dental implants is an important part of recovering from periodontal disease.

  • Could You Benefit from Cosmetic Dentistry Treatment?

    Cosmetic dentistry treatments can be life-changing for many patients. Whether you have made hiding your teeth a habit or just wish you could tweak one small detail about your smile, cosmetic dentistry treatments can help. Find out how cosmetic dentistry treatments, like veneers in Peoria, could help you by making an appointment with a provider for an evaluation. Here are some signs that cosmetic dentistry could work for you.

    Cosmetic-Dentistry

    You Have Stained Teeth

    Many things you do throughout the day, from eating berries to sipping wine, can leave stains on your teeth. Over time, these stains can make your teeth look dull and yellow, which keeps your smile from looking its best. Fortunately, teeth whitening treatments can remove the stains and restore your bright, white smile. If you have severe teeth staining that can’t be addressed by whitening treatments, veneers can hide the discoloration and give you long-lasting whiteness.

    Your Teeth Are Misaligned

    Misaligned teeth can cause a range of oral health problems, including cavities and periodontal disease, because they make brushing and flossing more difficult. For many people, however, their misaligned teeth are simply a source of self-confidence issues, because they impact the look of their smile. Your cosmetic dentist may suggest Invisalign treatment to correct alignment issues. Invisalign uses clear, plastic aligners to move your teeth into more desired positions without the hassle of metal brackets and wires. Invisalign offers faster outcomes than braces and is ideal for adult patients who want orthodontic treatment but are uncomfortable wearing traditional braces.

    Your Smile Is Holding You Back

    When you don’t love your smile, every part of your world is affected, from your personal relationships to your professional life. If your smile is impacting your self-esteem, talk to a cosmetic dentist. No matter how dramatic or minor your concern is, treatments are available that are quick, painless, and effective. There’s no need to suffer with a smile you don’t love for another day.

  • Steps You Can Take to Reduce Your Risk of Tooth Loss

    Millions of Americans suffer from missing teeth and the associated complications. As your dentist near Peoria can attest, in addition to natural teeth, dental crowns and bridges can also be lost. Adult teeth can fall out for many reasons. Many people lose teeth due to accident or injury, periodontal disease, or severe decay. Keep reading to learn what you can do to reduce your risk of tooth loss, including keeping up with oral hygiene, mouth protection, and dental visits.

    Oral Hygiene

    Maintain Good Oral Hygiene

    While dental implants now offer permanent solutions for missing teeth, the best way to preserve your oral health is to keep all natural teeth intact. To maintain superior oral hygiene, brush your teeth twice each day with fluoride toothpaste. You should also floss every night before bed with an ADA-approved dental floss. Brushing and flossing your teeth are essential for removing plaque, a sticky bacterial film that accumulates on your teeth and gums. If you do not eliminate plaque, it can eventually cause periodontal disease and tooth decay, both of which contribute to tooth loss.

    Consider Mouth Protection

    To preserve your smile, always wear a mouthguard when playing contact sports. A mouthguard will help protect your tooth enamel, or the outermost covering of your teeth. When your tooth enamel is worn down, it cannot grow back on its own and your teeth will be more vulnerable to decay. Many people also suffer chipped, broken, or knocked-out teeth due to sports injuries. A mouthguard will help to protect your teeth and soft mouth tissues from injury.

    Attend Regular Dental Visits

    Regular check-ups with a dentist near you are essential to keeping your smile whole. Only a dentist or dental hygienist can use the necessary tools to professionally clean your teeth, reaching spots that your toothbrush cannot quite access. Plaque and tartar buildup will cause tooth decay and periodontal disease if not treated by a dentist. Periodontal disease is the leading cause of tooth loss around the world. When you visit your dentist, he or she can diagnose gum disease in its early stages and reverse its symptoms.

  • The Most Common Causes of Tooth Pain

    Just when the workweek gets hectic, you feel a pulsating ache in your mouth that demands immediate attention. When you visit a dentist for tooth pain in Peoria, chances are that the problem stems from one of these several common practices and problems.

    Bad Habits
    Chewing gum and grinding your teeth can cause wear down teeth and make it difficult to protect tooth enamel. toothache Peoria Patients who regularly grind their teeth can create problems such as a shifted bite, tooth fractures and unevenness. Potential injuries can be avoided by wearing a mouthguard during sleep. Sugar-laden gum can increase acids that cause decay; switching to a sugar-free product can alleviate decay problems associated with gum chewing.

    Tooth Decay or Abscessed Tooth
    Tooth decay is damage that results when carbohydrates remain on your teeth. They are turned into acids by mouth bacteria, and combine with saliva to create plaque that in turn adheres itself to your teeth. The plaque acids dissolve the tooth’s enamel and cavities form. An abscessed tooth is most often a direct result of tooth decay. It is a painful infection found at the root or between a tooth and gum. Other scenarios that lead to an abscessed tooth are gum disease, gingivitis, or a chipped or broken tooth. The resulting toothache can be severe, with patients reporting sharp, severe or throbbing pain.

    Infected Gums
    When the gum and bone separate from the teeth and form pockets, debris collects and the gums become infected. Gum disease (periodontitis) is the stage that follows untreated gum inflammation, also known as gingivitis. One common early sign of gingivitis are gums that bleed when you brush your teeth.

    Damaged Fillings or Tooth Fractures
    When you don’t protect tooth enamel, decay can expose the nerve and necessitate a filling. A dentist will numb the local area, remove any decayed matter and fill the hole. If the filling becomes damaged, the nerve will be re-exposed and create the need for a replacement filling. With a tooth fracture, your dentist will choose one or more techniques to correct it, including crowns, veneers, bonding and root canals.

  • How to Prevent Periodontal Disease

    The effects of periodontal disease can be devastating for your overall health. When plaque builds up between your gums and teeth, it creates gum inflammation known as gingivitis. When untreated, the inflammation can increase in severity, and can lead to receding gums or tooth loss. If you’re concerned about your current gum health, contact a dentist who specializes in periodontal disease near Peoria. If your teeth are presently healthy, stick to a few basic habits that will protect tooth enamel and allow you to keep your healthy smile.

    Brush your Teeth
    The simplest method available to protect mouth health is to brush your teeth and tongue after meals. The habit Preventing Periodontal Disease Peoria will help you remove plaque and debris from food, and has the added benefit of freshening your breath.

    Floss
    Brushing alone can’t get in all the thin crevices and tight spaces between your teeth. When you floss once a day, you’ll eliminate buildup of plaque and food between your teeth that can’t be reached any other way.

    Use Mouthwash
    Reaching every rounded angle in your mouth with a toothbrush or floss isn’t possible. That’s why rinsing with mouthwash is a necessary third step for clearing away additional food residue and plaque. By flushing out more buildup, you increase the chances that you will protect tooth enamel and avoid gum inflammation.

    Understand and Minimize your Risk
    As you age, the risk for gum disease unavoidably increases. Other risk factors such as diet and smoking can be controlled with personal lifestyle changes, although genetics is the luck of the draw. Anyone who has one or more factors that increase risk should make an appointment with a dental professional.

    Visit a Periodontist
    Taking preventative measures is an important step to avoiding the need for periodontal disease treatment. An annual comprehensive periodontal evaluation (CPE) will assess symptoms and risk factors that might point to the early stages of gum disease. During the exam, a dental professional will view your teeth, gums, bite, plaque level and bone structure, and discuss your external risk factors.